Stories

Congressman John Lewis’s March for Equality

Born into sharecropper life near Troy, Alabama, in 1940, John Lewis’s childhood wasn’t draped in silk or silver spoons. He witnessed firsthand the sting of segregation and the injustice faced by Black communities. Yet, within him flickered a defiant flame, a yearning for equality that would propel him to become a pivotal figure in the Civil Rights Movement and a revered Congressman, earning him the title “the conscience of the Congress.”

His path wasn’t paved with Ivy League degrees or inherited wealth. Lewis honed his leadership skills and unwavering faith through sheer grit and steadfast dedication. At 15, a radio sermon by Martin Luther King Jr. sparked a fire within him, igniting his passion for activism and justice. He joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as a teenager, his youthful idealism fueling his commitment to nonviolent protest and voter registration drives.

Lewis’s journey wasn’t a straight line from rural Alabama to the halls of Congress. He faced countless challenges and dangers. He was beaten on the Edmund Pettus Bridge during the Bloody Sunday march in Selma, a pivotal moment in the Civil Rights Movement that etched its mark on his soul and the nation’s conscience. He endured arrests, intimidation, and threats, yet his resolve never wavered.

His impact wasn’t confined to marches and speeches. Lewis became a strategic leader, organizing Freedom Rides and sit-ins, challenging discriminatory Jim Crow laws, and demanding equal access to public spaces and services. He worked tirelessly to register Black voters, understanding the power of the ballot box as a tool for change. He co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, challenging the exclusion of Black voices in the political landscape.

But Lewis’s legacy extends far beyond the Civil Rights Movement. He served 17 terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, representing Georgia and championing issues like healthcare, education, and economic justice. He stood as a moral compass, speaking truth to power and advocating for the marginalized. He tirelessly fought for gun control and immigration reform, his unwavering belief in human dignity transcending political boundaries.

Throughout his life, Lewis faced numerous setbacks, from personal loss to political disappointments. Yet, his unwavering faith and commitment to nonviolence never faltered. He remained a steadfast advocate for peace, reconciliation, and understanding, earning him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011, a testament to his lifelong dedication to justice.

Though John Lewis passed away in 2020, his legacy continues to shine brightly. His life serves as a testament to the power of courage, the importance of unwavering conviction, and the relentless pursuit of a more equitable world.

To delve deeper into Lewis’s extraordinary journey and the countless other stories of Black icons who dared to challenge the status quo and fight for a better world, tune in to Impact Family. This platform offers a treasure trove of educational and inspiring films that celebrate the achievements and struggles of Black communities. So, settle in, stay glued, and let the stories of trailblazers like John Lewis ignite your passion for social justice, empower you to speak out against injustice, and inspire you to continue the march toward a world where equality is not just a dream, but a lived reality.

Kamala Harris’s rise from California Courtroom to White House Corridors

Kamala Harris’s story isn’t woven from privilege and gilded paths. Born in Oakland, California, in 1964, her childhood was etched with the realities of a bicultural identity and the complexities of navigating a society steeped in racial and gender inequities. Yet, within her burned a relentless spirit, a fierce determination to defy limitations and forge a path paved with justice and service.

Her journey wasn’t paved with silver spoons and Ivy League accents. Harris honed her intellect and leadership skills through sheer grit and a thirst for knowledge. Raised by two immigrant parents, an Indian biologist, and a Jamaican economist, she absorbed a multicultural perspective and a deep understanding of the struggles faced by marginalized communities.

Her education at Howard University and UC Hastings College of Law, institutions steeped in activism and social justice, furthered her commitment to fighting for change.

Harris’s path wasn’t a straight line to power and prestige. She began her legal career in the Alameda County District Attorney’s office, tackling child sexual assault cases with unwavering resolve. This early experience fueled her passion for protecting the vulnerable and holding systems of power accountable. Ascent through the ranks, becoming District Attorney of San Francisco and then California Attorney General, demonstrated her dedication to public service and her sharp legal mind.

But Harris’s impact wasn’t confined to courtrooms and legal briefs. She became a trailblazer, shattering glass ceilings and redefining what it meant to be a leader. As the first woman of color elected Attorney General of California, she tackled issues like environmental protection, mortgage fraud, and human trafficking, leaving a legacy of progressive reforms and unwavering advocacy for the underserved.

In 2016, she made history again, being elected as the junior Senator from California. In the Senate, her voice resonated with millions, her sharp questioning of witnesses and passionate eloquence on issues like racial justice, healthcare, and voting rights captivating audiences and earning her a reputation as a formidable political force.

Her 2020 Vice Presidential campaign, alongside then-candidate Joe Biden, further cemented her place in history as the first woman of color and the first Asian-American on a major party’s presidential ticket. Her electrifying speeches, grounded in personal experience and fueled by a vision of a fairer future, resonated with a nation yearning for change.

In 2021, Harris made history once more, sworn in as the 49th Vice President of the United States. Her ascent to the White House, a symbol of progress and inclusivity, marked a watershed moment in American history and ignited a sense of hope in millions who saw their own stories reflected in her journey.

Kamala Harris’s story is more than just one of personal achievement; it’s a testament to the power of resilience, the importance of representation, and the unwavering pursuit of a more just and equitable world. To delve deeper into her extraordinary life and the countless other stories of Black icons who have redefined possibility and empowered their communities, tune in to Impact Family.

Here are Kamala Harris’s Top five Achievements in the United States:

1. Breaking Glass Ceilings: Harris shattered significant barriers by becoming

  • The first woman of color elected Attorney General of California (2010).
  • The first woman of color and the first Asian-American were elected senator from California (2016).
  • The first woman of color and first Asian-American on a major party’s presidential ticket (2020).
  • The 49th and first female United States Vice President (2021). These historical firsts represent significant progress in American representation and diversity, inspiring future generations.

2. Championing Criminal Justice Reform

As California Attorney General, Harris implemented progressive reforms like reducing recidivism through prisoner reentry programs and creating an implicit bias training program for law enforcement. She also challenged the death penalty and fought against wrongful convictions.

3. Protecting Vulnerable Communities

During her Senate tenure, Harris focused on protecting vulnerable communities through legislation and advocacy. She championed issues like:

  • Combating human trafficking: Authored the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act to strengthen law enforcement’s ability to combat human trafficking.
  • Protecting women’s reproductive rights: Consistently defended Planned Parenthood and advocated for women’s access to healthcare.
  • Holding big banks accountable: Scrutinized Wall Street institutions for predatory practices and fought for consumer protections.

4. Fighting for Economic Justice

Harris has consistently advocated for policies that promote economic fairness and opportunity. She supports raising the minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare, and closing the racial wealth gap.

5. Building International Partnerships

As Vice President, Harris has played a vital role in strengthening America’s relationships with allies, particularly in promoting:

  • Regional stability and cooperation: Fostering partnerships with Mexico and Central American countries to address migration challenges and economic development.
  • Fighting global challenges: Pushing for global coordination on climate change and pandemic preparedness.

These are just some of Kamala Harris’s notable achievements in the United States. It’s important to note that her tenure as Vice President is still ongoing, and her impact will continue to evolve.

This platform offers a treasure trove of educational and inspiring films that celebrate the achievements and struggles of Black communities. So, settle in, stay glued, and let the stories of trailblazers like Kamala Harris ignite your own passion for public service, empower you to challenge the systems that perpetuate inequality, and inspire you to build a world where inclusivity and opportunity are not aspirations, but lived realities.

Why is Black History Month Important?

Initially, Black History Month was a way of teaching students and young people about Black and African-Americans’ contributions. Such stories had been largely forgotten and were a neglected part of the national narrative.

Now, it’s seen as a celebration of those who’ve impacted not just the country but the world with their activism and achievements. In the US, the month-long spotlight during February is an opportunity for people to engage with Black histories, go beyond discussions of racism and slavery, and highlight Black leaders and accomplishments. Every year, a theme is chosen by the ASALH, the group originally founded by Woodson. This year’s theme, “Black Resistance” focuses on how, through resistance, Black people have “achieved triumphs, successes, and progress” in the US.

For many modern Black millennials, the month-long celebration for Black History Month offers an opportunity to reimagine what possibilities lie ahead. But for many, the forces that drove Woodson nearly a century ago are more relevant than ever.

As Lonnie G. Bunch III, Director of the Smithsonian Institution said at the opening of the Washington D.C.’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in 2016: “There is no more powerful force than a people steeped in their history. And there is no higher cause than honoring our struggle and ancestors by remembering”.

3 Books to add to your reading list this month

Black History Month is a month of learning and remembering. Reading can help you do both. Check out these three books and consider adding them to your list of books to read this month, or this year.

 

  • Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti–Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the lives of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and anti-racists.

From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W. E. B. Du Bois to legendary anti–prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro–civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America.

As Kendi illustrates, racist thinking did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Racist ideas were created and popularized in an effort to defend deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and to rationalize the nation’s racial inequities in everything from wealth to health. While racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much–needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers tools to expose them—and in the process, the reason to hope.

  • Woman Evolve: Break Up with Your Fears and Revolutionize Your Life by Sarah Jakes Roberts

Reimagining the story of Eve, Sarah Jakes Roberts draws lessons from

Scripture and from her own life show women how to use the

mistakes of their past to overcome the challenges of today. Discover Sarah Jakes Roberts, with life lessons she’s learned and new insights from the story of Eve, shows you how the disappointments and even mistakes of your past can be used today to help you become the woman God intended.

Who would imagine being friends with Eve–the woman who’s been held solely responsible for the fall of humanity (and cramps) for thousands of years? Certainly not Sarah Jakes Roberts. That is, not until Sarah discovered she is more like Eve than she cares to admit. Everyone faces trials, and everyone will mess up. But failure should not be the focus.

Your focus should not be on who you were but rather on the pursuit of who you can become. In Woman Evolve, Sarah helps you to understand that your purpose in life does not change; it evolves.

  • Speak: Find Your Voice, Trust Your Gut, and Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be by Tunde Oyeneyin

From Tunde Oyeneyin, the massively popular Peloton instructor, fitness star, and founder of SPEAK comes an empowering, inspiring book about how she transformed grief, setbacks, and flaws into growth, self-confidence, and triumph—perfect for fans of Shonda Rhimes, Brene Brown, and Glennon Doyle.

On any given day, thousands of devoted people clip into their bikes and have their lives changed by Tunde Oyeneyin. From her platform in a Peloton studio, she encourages riders with her trademark blend of positivity, empathy, and motivational “Tunde-isms,” to push themselves to their limits both on and off the bike.

Now, fans and readers everywhere can learn about her personal journey, and discover how they too can “live a life of purpose, on purpose” with Speak, a memoir-manifesto-guide to life inspired by her immensely popular Instagram Live series of the same name.

 

Congressman John Lewis’s March for Equality

Born into sharecropper life near Troy, Alabama, in 1940, John Lewis’s childhood wasn’t draped in silk or silver spoons. He witnessed firsthand the sting of segregation and the injustice faced by Black communities. Yet, within him flickered a defiant flame, a yearning for equality that would propel him to become a pivotal figure in the Civil Rights Movement and a revered Congressman, earning him the title “the conscience of the Congress.”

His path wasn’t paved with Ivy League degrees or inherited wealth. Lewis honed his leadership skills and unwavering faith through sheer grit and steadfast dedication. At 15, a radio sermon by Martin Luther King Jr. sparked a fire within him, igniting his passion for activism and justice. He joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as a teenager, his youthful idealism fueling his commitment to nonviolent protest and voter registration drives.

Lewis’s journey wasn’t a straight line from rural Alabama to the halls of Congress. He faced countless challenges and dangers. He was beaten on the Edmund Pettus Bridge during the Bloody Sunday march in Selma, a pivotal moment in the Civil Rights Movement that etched its mark on his soul and the nation’s conscience. He endured arrests, intimidation, and threats, yet his resolve never wavered.

His impact wasn’t confined to marches and speeches. Lewis became a strategic leader, organizing Freedom Rides and sit-ins, challenging discriminatory Jim Crow laws, and demanding equal access to public spaces and services. He worked tirelessly to register Black voters, understanding the power of the ballot box as a tool for change. He co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, challenging the exclusion of Black voices in the political landscape.

But Lewis’s legacy extends far beyond the Civil Rights Movement. He served 17 terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, representing Georgia and championing issues like healthcare, education, and economic justice. He stood as a moral compass, speaking truth to power and advocating for the marginalized. He tirelessly fought for gun control and immigration reform, his unwavering belief in human dignity transcending political boundaries.

Throughout his life, Lewis faced numerous setbacks, from personal loss to political disappointments. Yet, his unwavering faith and commitment to nonviolence never faltered. He remained a steadfast advocate for peace, reconciliation, and understanding, earning him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011, a testament to his lifelong dedication to justice.

Though John Lewis passed away in 2020, his legacy continues to shine brightly. His life serves as a testament to the power of courage, the importance of unwavering conviction, and the relentless pursuit of a more equitable world.

To delve deeper into Lewis’s extraordinary journey and the countless other stories of Black icons who dared to challenge the status quo and fight for a better world, tune in to Impact Family. This platform offers a treasure trove of educational and inspiring films that celebrate the achievements and struggles of Black communities. So, settle in, stay glued, and let the stories of trailblazers like John Lewis ignite your passion for social justice, empower you to speak out against injustice, and inspire you to continue the march toward a world where equality is not just a dream, but a lived reality.

Kamala Harris’s rise from California Courtroom to White House Corridors

Kamala Harris’s story isn’t woven from privilege and gilded paths. Born in Oakland, California, in 1964, her childhood was etched with the realities of a bicultural identity and the complexities of navigating a society steeped in racial and gender inequities. Yet, within her burned a relentless spirit, a fierce determination to defy limitations and forge a path paved with justice and service.

Her journey wasn’t paved with silver spoons and Ivy League accents. Harris honed her intellect and leadership skills through sheer grit and a thirst for knowledge. Raised by two immigrant parents, an Indian biologist, and a Jamaican economist, she absorbed a multicultural perspective and a deep understanding of the struggles faced by marginalized communities.

Her education at Howard University and UC Hastings College of Law, institutions steeped in activism and social justice, furthered her commitment to fighting for change.

Harris’s path wasn’t a straight line to power and prestige. She began her legal career in the Alameda County District Attorney’s office, tackling child sexual assault cases with unwavering resolve. This early experience fueled her passion for protecting the vulnerable and holding systems of power accountable. Ascent through the ranks, becoming District Attorney of San Francisco and then California Attorney General, demonstrated her dedication to public service and her sharp legal mind.

But Harris’s impact wasn’t confined to courtrooms and legal briefs. She became a trailblazer, shattering glass ceilings and redefining what it meant to be a leader. As the first woman of color elected Attorney General of California, she tackled issues like environmental protection, mortgage fraud, and human trafficking, leaving a legacy of progressive reforms and unwavering advocacy for the underserved.

In 2016, she made history again, being elected as the junior Senator from California. In the Senate, her voice resonated with millions, her sharp questioning of witnesses and passionate eloquence on issues like racial justice, healthcare, and voting rights captivating audiences and earning her a reputation as a formidable political force.

Her 2020 Vice Presidential campaign, alongside then-candidate Joe Biden, further cemented her place in history as the first woman of color and the first Asian-American on a major party’s presidential ticket. Her electrifying speeches, grounded in personal experience and fueled by a vision of a fairer future, resonated with a nation yearning for change.

In 2021, Harris made history once more, sworn in as the 49th Vice President of the United States. Her ascent to the White House, a symbol of progress and inclusivity, marked a watershed moment in American history and ignited a sense of hope in millions who saw their own stories reflected in her journey.

Kamala Harris’s story is more than just one of personal achievement; it’s a testament to the power of resilience, the importance of representation, and the unwavering pursuit of a more just and equitable world. To delve deeper into her extraordinary life and the countless other stories of Black icons who have redefined possibility and empowered their communities, tune in to Impact Family.

Here are Kamala Harris’s Top five Achievements in the United States:

1. Breaking Glass Ceilings: Harris shattered significant barriers by becoming

  • The first woman of color elected Attorney General of California (2010).
  • The first woman of color and the first Asian-American were elected senator from California (2016).
  • The first woman of color and first Asian-American on a major party’s presidential ticket (2020).
  • The 49th and first female United States Vice President (2021). These historical firsts represent significant progress in American representation and diversity, inspiring future generations.

2. Championing Criminal Justice Reform

As California Attorney General, Harris implemented progressive reforms like reducing recidivism through prisoner reentry programs and creating an implicit bias training program for law enforcement. She also challenged the death penalty and fought against wrongful convictions.

3. Protecting Vulnerable Communities

During her Senate tenure, Harris focused on protecting vulnerable communities through legislation and advocacy. She championed issues like:

  • Combating human trafficking: Authored the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act to strengthen law enforcement’s ability to combat human trafficking.
  • Protecting women’s reproductive rights: Consistently defended Planned Parenthood and advocated for women’s access to healthcare.
  • Holding big banks accountable: Scrutinized Wall Street institutions for predatory practices and fought for consumer protections.

4. Fighting for Economic Justice

Harris has consistently advocated for policies that promote economic fairness and opportunity. She supports raising the minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare, and closing the racial wealth gap.

5. Building International Partnerships

As Vice President, Harris has played a vital role in strengthening America’s relationships with allies, particularly in promoting:

  • Regional stability and cooperation: Fostering partnerships with Mexico and Central American countries to address migration challenges and economic development.
  • Fighting global challenges: Pushing for global coordination on climate change and pandemic preparedness.

These are just some of Kamala Harris’s notable achievements in the United States. It’s important to note that her tenure as Vice President is still ongoing, and her impact will continue to evolve.

This platform offers a treasure trove of educational and inspiring films that celebrate the achievements and struggles of Black communities. So, settle in, stay glued, and let the stories of trailblazers like Kamala Harris ignite your own passion for public service, empower you to challenge the systems that perpetuate inequality, and inspire you to build a world where inclusivity and opportunity are not aspirations, but lived realities.

Why is Black History Month Important?

Initially, Black History Month was a way of teaching students and young people about Black and African-Americans’ contributions. Such stories had been largely forgotten and were a neglected part of the national narrative.

Now, it’s seen as a celebration of those who’ve impacted not just the country but the world with their activism and achievements. In the US, the month-long spotlight during February is an opportunity for people to engage with Black histories, go beyond discussions of racism and slavery, and highlight Black leaders and accomplishments. Every year, a theme is chosen by the ASALH, the group originally founded by Woodson. This year’s theme, “Black Resistance” focuses on how, through resistance, Black people have “achieved triumphs, successes, and progress” in the US.

For many modern Black millennials, the month-long celebration for Black History Month offers an opportunity to reimagine what possibilities lie ahead. But for many, the forces that drove Woodson nearly a century ago are more relevant than ever.

As Lonnie G. Bunch III, Director of the Smithsonian Institution said at the opening of the Washington D.C.’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in 2016: “There is no more powerful force than a people steeped in their history. And there is no higher cause than honoring our struggle and ancestors by remembering”.

3 Books to add to your reading list this month

Black History Month is a month of learning and remembering. Reading can help you do both. Check out these three books and consider adding them to your list of books to read this month, or this year.

 

  • Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti–Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the lives of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and anti-racists.

From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W. E. B. Du Bois to legendary anti–prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro–civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America.

As Kendi illustrates, racist thinking did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Racist ideas were created and popularized in an effort to defend deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and to rationalize the nation’s racial inequities in everything from wealth to health. While racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much–needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers tools to expose them—and in the process, the reason to hope.

  • Woman Evolve: Break Up with Your Fears and Revolutionize Your Life by Sarah Jakes Roberts

Reimagining the story of Eve, Sarah Jakes Roberts draws lessons from

Scripture and from her own life show women how to use the

mistakes of their past to overcome the challenges of today. Discover Sarah Jakes Roberts, with life lessons she’s learned and new insights from the story of Eve, shows you how the disappointments and even mistakes of your past can be used today to help you become the woman God intended.

Who would imagine being friends with Eve–the woman who’s been held solely responsible for the fall of humanity (and cramps) for thousands of years? Certainly not Sarah Jakes Roberts. That is, not until Sarah discovered she is more like Eve than she cares to admit. Everyone faces trials, and everyone will mess up. But failure should not be the focus.

Your focus should not be on who you were but rather on the pursuit of who you can become. In Woman Evolve, Sarah helps you to understand that your purpose in life does not change; it evolves.

  • Speak: Find Your Voice, Trust Your Gut, and Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be by Tunde Oyeneyin

From Tunde Oyeneyin, the massively popular Peloton instructor, fitness star, and founder of SPEAK comes an empowering, inspiring book about how she transformed grief, setbacks, and flaws into growth, self-confidence, and triumph—perfect for fans of Shonda Rhimes, Brene Brown, and Glennon Doyle.

On any given day, thousands of devoted people clip into their bikes and have their lives changed by Tunde Oyeneyin. From her platform in a Peloton studio, she encourages riders with her trademark blend of positivity, empathy, and motivational “Tunde-isms,” to push themselves to their limits both on and off the bike.

Now, fans and readers everywhere can learn about her personal journey, and discover how they too can “live a life of purpose, on purpose” with Speak, a memoir-manifesto-guide to life inspired by her immensely popular Instagram Live series of the same name.

 

Congressman John Lewis’s March for Equality

Born into sharecropper life near Troy, Alabama, in 1940, John Lewis’s childhood wasn’t draped in silk or silver spoons. He witnessed firsthand the sting of segregation and the injustice faced by Black communities. Yet, within him flickered a defiant flame, a yearning for equality that would propel him to become a pivotal figure in the Civil Rights Movement and a revered Congressman, earning him the title “the conscience of the Congress.”

His path wasn’t paved with Ivy League degrees or inherited wealth. Lewis honed his leadership skills and unwavering faith through sheer grit and steadfast dedication. At 15, a radio sermon by Martin Luther King Jr. sparked a fire within him, igniting his passion for activism and justice. He joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as a teenager, his youthful idealism fueling his commitment to nonviolent protest and voter registration drives.

Lewis’s journey wasn’t a straight line from rural Alabama to the halls of Congress. He faced countless challenges and dangers. He was beaten on the Edmund Pettus Bridge during the Bloody Sunday march in Selma, a pivotal moment in the Civil Rights Movement that etched its mark on his soul and the nation’s conscience. He endured arrests, intimidation, and threats, yet his resolve never wavered.

His impact wasn’t confined to marches and speeches. Lewis became a strategic leader, organizing Freedom Rides and sit-ins, challenging discriminatory Jim Crow laws, and demanding equal access to public spaces and services. He worked tirelessly to register Black voters, understanding the power of the ballot box as a tool for change. He co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, challenging the exclusion of Black voices in the political landscape.

But Lewis’s legacy extends far beyond the Civil Rights Movement. He served 17 terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, representing Georgia and championing issues like healthcare, education, and economic justice. He stood as a moral compass, speaking truth to power and advocating for the marginalized. He tirelessly fought for gun control and immigration reform, his unwavering belief in human dignity transcending political boundaries.

Throughout his life, Lewis faced numerous setbacks, from personal loss to political disappointments. Yet, his unwavering faith and commitment to nonviolence never faltered. He remained a steadfast advocate for peace, reconciliation, and understanding, earning him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011, a testament to his lifelong dedication to justice.

Though John Lewis passed away in 2020, his legacy continues to shine brightly. His life serves as a testament to the power of courage, the importance of unwavering conviction, and the relentless pursuit of a more equitable world.

To delve deeper into Lewis’s extraordinary journey and the countless other stories of Black icons who dared to challenge the status quo and fight for a better world, tune in to Impact Family. This platform offers a treasure trove of educational and inspiring films that celebrate the achievements and struggles of Black communities. So, settle in, stay glued, and let the stories of trailblazers like John Lewis ignite your passion for social justice, empower you to speak out against injustice, and inspire you to continue the march toward a world where equality is not just a dream, but a lived reality.

Kamala Harris’s rise from California Courtroom to White House Corridors

Kamala Harris’s story isn’t woven from privilege and gilded paths. Born in Oakland, California, in 1964, her childhood was etched with the realities of a bicultural identity and the complexities of navigating a society steeped in racial and gender inequities. Yet, within her burned a relentless spirit, a fierce determination to defy limitations and forge a path paved with justice and service.

Her journey wasn’t paved with silver spoons and Ivy League accents. Harris honed her intellect and leadership skills through sheer grit and a thirst for knowledge. Raised by two immigrant parents, an Indian biologist, and a Jamaican economist, she absorbed a multicultural perspective and a deep understanding of the struggles faced by marginalized communities.

Her education at Howard University and UC Hastings College of Law, institutions steeped in activism and social justice, furthered her commitment to fighting for change.

Harris’s path wasn’t a straight line to power and prestige. She began her legal career in the Alameda County District Attorney’s office, tackling child sexual assault cases with unwavering resolve. This early experience fueled her passion for protecting the vulnerable and holding systems of power accountable. Ascent through the ranks, becoming District Attorney of San Francisco and then California Attorney General, demonstrated her dedication to public service and her sharp legal mind.

But Harris’s impact wasn’t confined to courtrooms and legal briefs. She became a trailblazer, shattering glass ceilings and redefining what it meant to be a leader. As the first woman of color elected Attorney General of California, she tackled issues like environmental protection, mortgage fraud, and human trafficking, leaving a legacy of progressive reforms and unwavering advocacy for the underserved.

In 2016, she made history again, being elected as the junior Senator from California. In the Senate, her voice resonated with millions, her sharp questioning of witnesses and passionate eloquence on issues like racial justice, healthcare, and voting rights captivating audiences and earning her a reputation as a formidable political force.

Her 2020 Vice Presidential campaign, alongside then-candidate Joe Biden, further cemented her place in history as the first woman of color and the first Asian-American on a major party’s presidential ticket. Her electrifying speeches, grounded in personal experience and fueled by a vision of a fairer future, resonated with a nation yearning for change.

In 2021, Harris made history once more, sworn in as the 49th Vice President of the United States. Her ascent to the White House, a symbol of progress and inclusivity, marked a watershed moment in American history and ignited a sense of hope in millions who saw their own stories reflected in her journey.

Kamala Harris’s story is more than just one of personal achievement; it’s a testament to the power of resilience, the importance of representation, and the unwavering pursuit of a more just and equitable world. To delve deeper into her extraordinary life and the countless other stories of Black icons who have redefined possibility and empowered their communities, tune in to Impact Family.

Here are Kamala Harris’s Top five Achievements in the United States:

1. Breaking Glass Ceilings: Harris shattered significant barriers by becoming

  • The first woman of color elected Attorney General of California (2010).
  • The first woman of color and the first Asian-American were elected senator from California (2016).
  • The first woman of color and first Asian-American on a major party’s presidential ticket (2020).
  • The 49th and first female United States Vice President (2021). These historical firsts represent significant progress in American representation and diversity, inspiring future generations.

2. Championing Criminal Justice Reform

As California Attorney General, Harris implemented progressive reforms like reducing recidivism through prisoner reentry programs and creating an implicit bias training program for law enforcement. She also challenged the death penalty and fought against wrongful convictions.

3. Protecting Vulnerable Communities

During her Senate tenure, Harris focused on protecting vulnerable communities through legislation and advocacy. She championed issues like:

  • Combating human trafficking: Authored the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act to strengthen law enforcement’s ability to combat human trafficking.
  • Protecting women’s reproductive rights: Consistently defended Planned Parenthood and advocated for women’s access to healthcare.
  • Holding big banks accountable: Scrutinized Wall Street institutions for predatory practices and fought for consumer protections.

4. Fighting for Economic Justice

Harris has consistently advocated for policies that promote economic fairness and opportunity. She supports raising the minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare, and closing the racial wealth gap.

5. Building International Partnerships

As Vice President, Harris has played a vital role in strengthening America’s relationships with allies, particularly in promoting:

  • Regional stability and cooperation: Fostering partnerships with Mexico and Central American countries to address migration challenges and economic development.
  • Fighting global challenges: Pushing for global coordination on climate change and pandemic preparedness.

These are just some of Kamala Harris’s notable achievements in the United States. It’s important to note that her tenure as Vice President is still ongoing, and her impact will continue to evolve.

This platform offers a treasure trove of educational and inspiring films that celebrate the achievements and struggles of Black communities. So, settle in, stay glued, and let the stories of trailblazers like Kamala Harris ignite your own passion for public service, empower you to challenge the systems that perpetuate inequality, and inspire you to build a world where inclusivity and opportunity are not aspirations, but lived realities.

Why is Black History Month Important?

Initially, Black History Month was a way of teaching students and young people about Black and African-Americans’ contributions. Such stories had been largely forgotten and were a neglected part of the national narrative.

Now, it’s seen as a celebration of those who’ve impacted not just the country but the world with their activism and achievements. In the US, the month-long spotlight during February is an opportunity for people to engage with Black histories, go beyond discussions of racism and slavery, and highlight Black leaders and accomplishments. Every year, a theme is chosen by the ASALH, the group originally founded by Woodson. This year’s theme, “Black Resistance” focuses on how, through resistance, Black people have “achieved triumphs, successes, and progress” in the US.

For many modern Black millennials, the month-long celebration for Black History Month offers an opportunity to reimagine what possibilities lie ahead. But for many, the forces that drove Woodson nearly a century ago are more relevant than ever.

As Lonnie G. Bunch III, Director of the Smithsonian Institution said at the opening of the Washington D.C.’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in 2016: “There is no more powerful force than a people steeped in their history. And there is no higher cause than honoring our struggle and ancestors by remembering”.

3 Books to add to your reading list this month

Black History Month is a month of learning and remembering. Reading can help you do both. Check out these three books and consider adding them to your list of books to read this month, or this year.

 

  • Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti–Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the lives of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and anti-racists.

From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W. E. B. Du Bois to legendary anti–prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro–civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America.

As Kendi illustrates, racist thinking did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Racist ideas were created and popularized in an effort to defend deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and to rationalize the nation’s racial inequities in everything from wealth to health. While racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much–needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers tools to expose them—and in the process, the reason to hope.

  • Woman Evolve: Break Up with Your Fears and Revolutionize Your Life by Sarah Jakes Roberts

Reimagining the story of Eve, Sarah Jakes Roberts draws lessons from

Scripture and from her own life show women how to use the

mistakes of their past to overcome the challenges of today. Discover Sarah Jakes Roberts, with life lessons she’s learned and new insights from the story of Eve, shows you how the disappointments and even mistakes of your past can be used today to help you become the woman God intended.

Who would imagine being friends with Eve–the woman who’s been held solely responsible for the fall of humanity (and cramps) for thousands of years? Certainly not Sarah Jakes Roberts. That is, not until Sarah discovered she is more like Eve than she cares to admit. Everyone faces trials, and everyone will mess up. But failure should not be the focus.

Your focus should not be on who you were but rather on the pursuit of who you can become. In Woman Evolve, Sarah helps you to understand that your purpose in life does not change; it evolves.

  • Speak: Find Your Voice, Trust Your Gut, and Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be by Tunde Oyeneyin

From Tunde Oyeneyin, the massively popular Peloton instructor, fitness star, and founder of SPEAK comes an empowering, inspiring book about how she transformed grief, setbacks, and flaws into growth, self-confidence, and triumph—perfect for fans of Shonda Rhimes, Brene Brown, and Glennon Doyle.

On any given day, thousands of devoted people clip into their bikes and have their lives changed by Tunde Oyeneyin. From her platform in a Peloton studio, she encourages riders with her trademark blend of positivity, empathy, and motivational “Tunde-isms,” to push themselves to their limits both on and off the bike.

Now, fans and readers everywhere can learn about her personal journey, and discover how they too can “live a life of purpose, on purpose” with Speak, a memoir-manifesto-guide to life inspired by her immensely popular Instagram Live series of the same name.

 

Congressman John Lewis’s March for Equality

Born into sharecropper life near Troy, Alabama, in 1940, John Lewis’s childhood wasn’t draped in silk or silver spoons. He witnessed firsthand the sting of segregation and the injustice faced by Black communities. Yet, within him flickered a defiant flame, a yearning for equality that would propel him to become a pivotal figure in the Civil Rights Movement and a revered Congressman, earning him the title “the conscience of the Congress.”

His path wasn’t paved with Ivy League degrees or inherited wealth. Lewis honed his leadership skills and unwavering faith through sheer grit and steadfast dedication. At 15, a radio sermon by Martin Luther King Jr. sparked a fire within him, igniting his passion for activism and justice. He joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as a teenager, his youthful idealism fueling his commitment to nonviolent protest and voter registration drives.

Lewis’s journey wasn’t a straight line from rural Alabama to the halls of Congress. He faced countless challenges and dangers. He was beaten on the Edmund Pettus Bridge during the Bloody Sunday march in Selma, a pivotal moment in the Civil Rights Movement that etched its mark on his soul and the nation’s conscience. He endured arrests, intimidation, and threats, yet his resolve never wavered.

His impact wasn’t confined to marches and speeches. Lewis became a strategic leader, organizing Freedom Rides and sit-ins, challenging discriminatory Jim Crow laws, and demanding equal access to public spaces and services. He worked tirelessly to register Black voters, understanding the power of the ballot box as a tool for change. He co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, challenging the exclusion of Black voices in the political landscape.

But Lewis’s legacy extends far beyond the Civil Rights Movement. He served 17 terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, representing Georgia and championing issues like healthcare, education, and economic justice. He stood as a moral compass, speaking truth to power and advocating for the marginalized. He tirelessly fought for gun control and immigration reform, his unwavering belief in human dignity transcending political boundaries.

Throughout his life, Lewis faced numerous setbacks, from personal loss to political disappointments. Yet, his unwavering faith and commitment to nonviolence never faltered. He remained a steadfast advocate for peace, reconciliation, and understanding, earning him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011, a testament to his lifelong dedication to justice.

Though John Lewis passed away in 2020, his legacy continues to shine brightly. His life serves as a testament to the power of courage, the importance of unwavering conviction, and the relentless pursuit of a more equitable world.

To delve deeper into Lewis’s extraordinary journey and the countless other stories of Black icons who dared to challenge the status quo and fight for a better world, tune in to Impact Family. This platform offers a treasure trove of educational and inspiring films that celebrate the achievements and struggles of Black communities. So, settle in, stay glued, and let the stories of trailblazers like John Lewis ignite your passion for social justice, empower you to speak out against injustice, and inspire you to continue the march toward a world where equality is not just a dream, but a lived reality.

Kamala Harris’s rise from California Courtroom to White House Corridors

Kamala Harris’s story isn’t woven from privilege and gilded paths. Born in Oakland, California, in 1964, her childhood was etched with the realities of a bicultural identity and the complexities of navigating a society steeped in racial and gender inequities. Yet, within her burned a relentless spirit, a fierce determination to defy limitations and forge a path paved with justice and service.

Her journey wasn’t paved with silver spoons and Ivy League accents. Harris honed her intellect and leadership skills through sheer grit and a thirst for knowledge. Raised by two immigrant parents, an Indian biologist, and a Jamaican economist, she absorbed a multicultural perspective and a deep understanding of the struggles faced by marginalized communities.

Her education at Howard University and UC Hastings College of Law, institutions steeped in activism and social justice, furthered her commitment to fighting for change.

Harris’s path wasn’t a straight line to power and prestige. She began her legal career in the Alameda County District Attorney’s office, tackling child sexual assault cases with unwavering resolve. This early experience fueled her passion for protecting the vulnerable and holding systems of power accountable. Ascent through the ranks, becoming District Attorney of San Francisco and then California Attorney General, demonstrated her dedication to public service and her sharp legal mind.

But Harris’s impact wasn’t confined to courtrooms and legal briefs. She became a trailblazer, shattering glass ceilings and redefining what it meant to be a leader. As the first woman of color elected Attorney General of California, she tackled issues like environmental protection, mortgage fraud, and human trafficking, leaving a legacy of progressive reforms and unwavering advocacy for the underserved.

In 2016, she made history again, being elected as the junior Senator from California. In the Senate, her voice resonated with millions, her sharp questioning of witnesses and passionate eloquence on issues like racial justice, healthcare, and voting rights captivating audiences and earning her a reputation as a formidable political force.

Her 2020 Vice Presidential campaign, alongside then-candidate Joe Biden, further cemented her place in history as the first woman of color and the first Asian-American on a major party’s presidential ticket. Her electrifying speeches, grounded in personal experience and fueled by a vision of a fairer future, resonated with a nation yearning for change.

In 2021, Harris made history once more, sworn in as the 49th Vice President of the United States. Her ascent to the White House, a symbol of progress and inclusivity, marked a watershed moment in American history and ignited a sense of hope in millions who saw their own stories reflected in her journey.

Kamala Harris’s story is more than just one of personal achievement; it’s a testament to the power of resilience, the importance of representation, and the unwavering pursuit of a more just and equitable world. To delve deeper into her extraordinary life and the countless other stories of Black icons who have redefined possibility and empowered their communities, tune in to Impact Family.

Here are Kamala Harris’s Top five Achievements in the United States:

1. Breaking Glass Ceilings: Harris shattered significant barriers by becoming

  • The first woman of color elected Attorney General of California (2010).
  • The first woman of color and the first Asian-American were elected senator from California (2016).
  • The first woman of color and first Asian-American on a major party’s presidential ticket (2020).
  • The 49th and first female United States Vice President (2021). These historical firsts represent significant progress in American representation and diversity, inspiring future generations.

2. Championing Criminal Justice Reform

As California Attorney General, Harris implemented progressive reforms like reducing recidivism through prisoner reentry programs and creating an implicit bias training program for law enforcement. She also challenged the death penalty and fought against wrongful convictions.

3. Protecting Vulnerable Communities

During her Senate tenure, Harris focused on protecting vulnerable communities through legislation and advocacy. She championed issues like:

  • Combating human trafficking: Authored the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act to strengthen law enforcement’s ability to combat human trafficking.
  • Protecting women’s reproductive rights: Consistently defended Planned Parenthood and advocated for women’s access to healthcare.
  • Holding big banks accountable: Scrutinized Wall Street institutions for predatory practices and fought for consumer protections.

4. Fighting for Economic Justice

Harris has consistently advocated for policies that promote economic fairness and opportunity. She supports raising the minimum wage, expanding access to affordable healthcare, and closing the racial wealth gap.

5. Building International Partnerships

As Vice President, Harris has played a vital role in strengthening America’s relationships with allies, particularly in promoting:

  • Regional stability and cooperation: Fostering partnerships with Mexico and Central American countries to address migration challenges and economic development.
  • Fighting global challenges: Pushing for global coordination on climate change and pandemic preparedness.

These are just some of Kamala Harris’s notable achievements in the United States. It’s important to note that her tenure as Vice President is still ongoing, and her impact will continue to evolve.

This platform offers a treasure trove of educational and inspiring films that celebrate the achievements and struggles of Black communities. So, settle in, stay glued, and let the stories of trailblazers like Kamala Harris ignite your own passion for public service, empower you to challenge the systems that perpetuate inequality, and inspire you to build a world where inclusivity and opportunity are not aspirations, but lived realities.

Why is Black History Month Important?

Initially, Black History Month was a way of teaching students and young people about Black and African-Americans’ contributions. Such stories had been largely forgotten and were a neglected part of the national narrative.

Now, it’s seen as a celebration of those who’ve impacted not just the country but the world with their activism and achievements. In the US, the month-long spotlight during February is an opportunity for people to engage with Black histories, go beyond discussions of racism and slavery, and highlight Black leaders and accomplishments. Every year, a theme is chosen by the ASALH, the group originally founded by Woodson. This year’s theme, “Black Resistance” focuses on how, through resistance, Black people have “achieved triumphs, successes, and progress” in the US.

For many modern Black millennials, the month-long celebration for Black History Month offers an opportunity to reimagine what possibilities lie ahead. But for many, the forces that drove Woodson nearly a century ago are more relevant than ever.

As Lonnie G. Bunch III, Director of the Smithsonian Institution said at the opening of the Washington D.C.’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in 2016: “There is no more powerful force than a people steeped in their history. And there is no higher cause than honoring our struggle and ancestors by remembering”.

3 Books to add to your reading list this month

Black History Month is a month of learning and remembering. Reading can help you do both. Check out these three books and consider adding them to your list of books to read this month, or this year.

 

  • Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi

In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti–Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the lives of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and anti-racists.

From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W. E. B. Du Bois to legendary anti–prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro–civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America.

As Kendi illustrates, racist thinking did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Racist ideas were created and popularized in an effort to defend deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and to rationalize the nation’s racial inequities in everything from wealth to health. While racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much–needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers tools to expose them—and in the process, the reason to hope.

  • Woman Evolve: Break Up with Your Fears and Revolutionize Your Life by Sarah Jakes Roberts

Reimagining the story of Eve, Sarah Jakes Roberts draws lessons from

Scripture and from her own life show women how to use the

mistakes of their past to overcome the challenges of today. Discover Sarah Jakes Roberts, with life lessons she’s learned and new insights from the story of Eve, shows you how the disappointments and even mistakes of your past can be used today to help you become the woman God intended.

Who would imagine being friends with Eve–the woman who’s been held solely responsible for the fall of humanity (and cramps) for thousands of years? Certainly not Sarah Jakes Roberts. That is, not until Sarah discovered she is more like Eve than she cares to admit. Everyone faces trials, and everyone will mess up. But failure should not be the focus.

Your focus should not be on who you were but rather on the pursuit of who you can become. In Woman Evolve, Sarah helps you to understand that your purpose in life does not change; it evolves.

  • Speak: Find Your Voice, Trust Your Gut, and Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be by Tunde Oyeneyin

From Tunde Oyeneyin, the massively popular Peloton instructor, fitness star, and founder of SPEAK comes an empowering, inspiring book about how she transformed grief, setbacks, and flaws into growth, self-confidence, and triumph—perfect for fans of Shonda Rhimes, Brene Brown, and Glennon Doyle.

On any given day, thousands of devoted people clip into their bikes and have their lives changed by Tunde Oyeneyin. From her platform in a Peloton studio, she encourages riders with her trademark blend of positivity, empathy, and motivational “Tunde-isms,” to push themselves to their limits both on and off the bike.

Now, fans and readers everywhere can learn about her personal journey, and discover how they too can “live a life of purpose, on purpose” with Speak, a memoir-manifesto-guide to life inspired by her immensely popular Instagram Live series of the same name.